Welcome

In the wake of the 2014 West African Ebola outbreak, the international spread of Zika, the ongoing transmission of antimicrobial resistance, and the ever-present threat of another influenza pandemic, global health security has taken on a new level of importance. Multiple commissions and high-level panels have been held, recommendations have been issued, and governments, international organisations, civil society and private industry have all committed to various initiatives aimed at improving health outcomes. Even so, significant challenges remain.

With support of our Conference Partners, we are hosting the first international conference on global health security in Sydney, Australia.

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GHS 2019 Will:

  • Bring together stakeholders working in global health security to measure progress, determine gaps, and identify new opportunities to enhance national, regional and global health security;
  • Provide a venue for government officials and International Organizations to share policy developments, hear from the research community, and create a space for side meetings that advance the health security agenda;
  • Establish and solidify a health security ‘community of practice’ and guiding principles;
  • Through an open call for abstracts, highlight work from partners around the world, bringing cutting edge, evidence-based research to the community;
  • Provide an opportunity for students to showcase their research;
  • Consider creating a professional association for global health security; and
  • Develop and endorse a ‘Sydney Statement’ on global health security.

Who should attend

The conference will bring together practitioners, researchers, educators, representatives and decision-makers across the fields of public health, medicine, veterinary science, agriculture, government, defence, international relations, sociology and anthropology to examine the progress made to date in strengthening health systems and identify the gaps and opportunities for enhancing the international community’s ability to respond more efficiently and effectively to future adverse health crises.